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513 Free Analogue Tube Drum Samples!

September 16, 2016 Leave a comment

FREE goodies from our friends over at Samplephonics

our-mission1

Samplephonics says:

Some time ago we gave away some deliciously tasty drum one shots that had been processed with some gorgeous analogue tube saturation. Since then, the Samplephonics community has grown dramatically and we thought it would be a shame to deprive all of our noobies from the tube goodness!

513-image

513 FREE ANALOGUE TUBE DRUMS SAMPLES!

We hope you enjoy this gift and turn these little beauties into something special. Send what you create with them to info@samplephonics.com

Until next time!

– The Samplephonics Team

https://beta.samplephonics.com/

Limits and Limitations. A Message for 2015

December 31, 2014 1 comment

Wishing you well in the coming year…

Words by Drew Spence

 

Happy New Year from Producer's Edge Magazine

Happy New Year

I‘m sure you’ve heard the saying “You can’t teach an old dog new tricks” Or that old(er) people become “Set in their ways“. We look at that- as a statement related to stubbornness and unwillingness to change or adapt. That rigid and dogged determination to remain the same is rooted in believing you have ‘mastered yourself’. And mastering means you have learned enough about yourself to tell others exactly how you operate. The problem is, I have never heard this sentiment used in a positive way. It usually refers to or outlines an imagined boundary and leads to excuses.

 

“I’m the kind of person that needs….”

“Knowing me, I probably won’t….”

“See, the way that I am…I can’t….”

“I really don’t do well, when…”

 

Instead of learning about where you need work, you’ve adopted a policy of avoiding anything that requires real work and effort.

 

“I tried that before and it didn’t work for me”

 

And so, instead if changing or improving the ‘me’, it’s easier to settle for living your life based off your natural talents and tendencies. You basically won’t do anything if it doesn’t come easily. Your definition of Mastering Yourself is actually learning to live within your limitations.

 

True Mastery is knowing how much work must be done on you before you can tackle a task. It’s realizing you may need to temporarily become a different type of person to achieve a particular goal.

 

A wise Kung-Fu Master once said:

‘Becoming a [Martial Arts] Master is not about being a master over others or an art. It’s becoming a master over yourself. You still have limitations, but you realize you can overcome them in the important moments you need to.”

 

It’s all about adapting and adopting…and adding new traits. How can you arrive someplace new by following the path you’ve been down before?

 

Happy New Year lots of music

In tune with more tunes

Resolutions and Re-Solutions

 

So why is this on the Producer’s Edge Blog and not The Dynamic Universe or even Rapper’s Delite? Because, as producers and artists, we tend to create a body of work and then use the overall assessment to assign limitations. They can sometimes be hidden by starters like “I work best when…” or “I’m in my zone if…”. That opening is usually followed by a narrow parameter which, in truth, is another limitation. Have you ever heard someone claim they have a dating type? This person is ‘my type’. And they know this by having several failed relationships with that ‘type of person’. That’s not their type, that’s simply who they keep choosing to date- regardless of the success rate or outcome. Your type is found in the relationship that works, not in the many that don’t. And that relationship works or fails by what you become while you are in it, not simply what passed easily between the two of you. That is our producer’s Edge – that understanding and choice of achieving something beyond the expected. The push to be more and find that limitation and then move the bar higher.

 

Learn yourself to learn what more you need to learn

 

I close with thoughts on resolutions. They seem to always be external.

I want this to be better…I want more…I want a new

Imagine if all that change was focused on improvement… if we were focused on attitude instead of altitude.

 

a BETTER state of mind.

MORE willingness to grow and acquire new skills and habits.

a NEW way of looking at ourselves

 

Let’s choose to be where we want and achieve what we want by Wanting to improve where we place focus and even what we choose to focus on.

Have a productive 2015.

 

-Drew Spence, Producer’s Edge Magazine

Setting Goals as a Producer

May 17, 2013 1 comment

Forum hound Griffin Avid chimes in over at FutureProducers and drops a gem or two…

A poster named Benjah had this thought and question…

Music Production Producer at console

Without a definite end, you may find yourself at the beginning.

Setting Goals as a producer.

So my summer has started and I am trying to Create a goal and a Plan for improving my production skills.

My only problem is the goal is extremely fuzzy. ” Considerably improve production skills.”

All research suggests that goals are best set as Specific Measurable, Attractive, Realistic and Time-Framed statements.

So how do i go about Making a Goal like this for production? What do you guys do? What is your goal setting process like? And while your here you can also give me some general suggestions on the process of improvement.

What is your goal setting process like?
=============================================================================
So how do i go about Making a Goal like this for production?
I say if your goal involves becoming a better producer, you need to do some producing.
Make your end goal to produce a real record by summer’s end.
If that’s the finish line; to release a project, then you can work backwards, step by step figuring out what you need to do and be doing week by week, day by day.

I don’t know too many people who just keep getting better and better (forever).
I know early on, it’s technical concerns…how do I…what fixes….what’s the best…
But after that, it’s all what you choose to do….
and I don’t think you make better choices without EXPERIENCE.

What I see are artists who always like their newest stuff more so they think they are improving-
when really they are just staying in the same place, which is slightly behind the curve.
When strings were poppin, they made 100 beats with strings….
When 808s were what’s up, they made 100 beats with 808s…..
When trap beats are….you get the idea…that guy will always be following the current trend trying to be relevant and always remaking his catalog.

That is also close to eras, like when you kept making the same kind of beats….and then you switch up. It’s possible that people could like a certain style of tracks more, but you don’t really find that out till you get out there and show some consistency.

What do you guys do?
First, pick your lane/direction. Understand that your goal is to be the best (you can be) in that direction.
I say you get past the technical concerns.
Can you make music? You got that part down yet?
Next, grab some acapellas and make some remixes.
Mostly, it’s about working with vocals. If that’s what’s at the end, why spend all your time playing around with loose beats and unfinished instrumentals?
Make some songs with other rapper’s vocals. That is the process.
You’ll learn to work harder and construct bridges, hooks, intros, outros, variations and you have the original track as a bar to rise to.
Not only can you share that music as a primer for what’s to come, you can use that feedback (FROM A LOT OF [regular = not other producers] PEOPLE) to figure out your weak/strong areas.
Real data on what works and what doesn’t.

Your music needs to improve to the point where NO ONE has technical concerns and feedback is only like or dislike or they like one track better than another.
When people want copies of your music to listen to and rappers want to rhyme and make songs with them…
makes it pretty easy to figure out how close you are. People should like and want to listen to your remixes. Someone should suggest you send it to the artist.
Comments like that are your gauge. If everyone just says “That’s nice” or “That’s cool” you’re not done yet.

What is your goal setting process like?
I write a list and have documents called planners. Planners are outlines for projects [title, song names, artists, business ideas even a tally of money spent]
There is also a list I have with things to do. It’s on one sheet of paper and as I do something I cross it off. When I get everything done that can be done in a day, I can relax fully.
There are so many things to do, you can’t possibly carry them around in your head, you’ll need to write them down. One column might be small stuff and another might be far off stuff that needs prep time.

And while your here you can also give me some general suggestions on the process of improvement.
Honestly, the simplest one is to decide who your target audience is and expose yourself for feedback.
There’s no point to using your imagination. “Boy when they hear this…”
“This is something they ought to like” “I wonder if…”

I’ve already typed too much but there is a balance between pleasing yourself and pleasing others.
You can do both, but if you (mentally) can’t; then you should pick one and accept your decision (and its consequences and/or benefits) and keep it moving.

– Griffin Avid 2013

Producer’s Edge Magazine Issue 09 Special Holidaze FALL 2011

December 9, 2011 Leave a comment
Producer's Edge Issue 09 Cover Happy Holidaze

Are you Naughty or Nice with it?

Producer’s Edge Digital Magazine Issue 09 has dropped. This is a special Holidaze themed issue. It’s all about the giving and the getting- – ready to have a productive 2012 and beyond. We’ll rewind with tips for making better beats and finding your signature sound. By the end we’ll know if you’ve been Naughty or Nice.

Xtra Content Subscribers do not need to download any of the FREE content inside this issue. You will be getting every item included in your normal Issue Download Package. Check your email. This issue’s Download is 1 Gig in size and can be purchased separately.

This issue’s package contains samples from:

Big Fish Audio Southern Grilin

Big Fish Audio Grind Mode R&B

Big Fish Audio The Crate Ultimate Urban Samples

Big Fish Audio Beatage

Visit Big Fish Audio

Enjoy the Holidaze Season and be safe, full of sound and productive.

-Drew Spence, Editor in Chief Producer’s Edge Magazine.

Issuu Producer’s Edge issue 09 Holidaze Special

http://issuu.com/producersedge/docs/issue_09_producers_edge_fall_2011

Subscribe to the Producer’s Edge Downloads

READ PREVIOUS ISSUE or BUY their Downloads

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What should I use to make beats? or Music Production: Where should I start?

November 12, 2010 3 comments

Music Production: Where should I start?

Words by Griffin Avid

Studio Picture

Gear to share what’s in your ear, right here

One of the most frequently asked question is ‘What do I need to get started with Hip Hop production?’ It’s overheard in music retailers and posted on forums. The typical answer usually consists of entry level software, a staple drum machine or workstation keyboard. More important that what you should get is what you bring to the table and how you intend to work.

My initial foray into Hip Hop consisted of commandeering the home stereo system (a phonograph was my first turntable) and digging through my sister’s closet for a microphone that came with her tape machine. The first sampler I ever used had 90 mins  sample time. Don’t sleep on the dual tape deck. My parent’s record collection was raided for my first sound library. Today, you might be utilizing mom’s old computer and the Casio keyboard you received for your 12th birthday.

No matter how you approach a production task, the workflow will involve both hardware and software. Hardware is controlled by software, software runs on hardware. Increasing the quality of either will have a positive effect on the sound quality of your production work. But! keep in mind it’s the relationship between your creativity and talent in conjunction with your tool set that decides the final results of your production work.

Teach me how to make beats

No one can teach you how to make beats. True, you can pick up a book about production or magazine and read up on the subject, scan a production website and dig through all sorts of tips and tricks. Yes, you can watch videos of another producer laying down tracks and adopt some of their working system. You might even be advised ‘Work at these tempos’ and ‘Put the snares and kicks here and here’. A mentor may even bring you along and share a production style or workflow. Fledgling producers may even snatch up the original samples used in a track and reverse engineer the composition. All these ‘educational exercises’ add tools to your box, but they do not teach you How, Why and When to use them. The actual learning occurs as you are producing.

What’s In a Studio?

The level of a studio is obviously defined by the sound coming out of it. There is base level of equipment any producer should aim to stay above. For the analogy of a tool set, you can imagine a wrench that was machined improperly. Now, instead of gripping and loosening, your tool is stripping the nut and damaging whatever you were working on. It follows then, you don’t need the most expensive tool set available to achieve great results, but I also stand by the cliché of selecting the right tool for the job. We won’t be discussing budget here since the ability to actually produce music is more important than assembling the ultimate studio on your first trip to the gear shop.

Audio Interface

The soundcard is a very important part of your studio chain and often a huge factor in the overall sound quality. The default card in a computer is usually inappropriate for music production since it lacks the base level connectors (RCA [back of your VCR]) and the number of adaptors needed to make studio connections degrades the signal too greatly. Be sure to take note of the actual connection points in your studio before you pick up a dozen XLRs and find you needed ¼ inch cables instead. Also pay attention to the end points. ‘Males’ are the plugs and ‘females’ are the sockets/openings.

MIDI Connections.

MIDI allows computers, synthesizers, MIDI controllers, sound cards, samplers and drum machines to control one another, and to exchange system data. MIDI does not transmit audio—it simply transmits real time digital data providing information such as the type and intensity of the musical notes and technical cues played during a performance.

Flexibility is key here. There is more to MIDI-ing  up a studio than Out going to IN. If you have several tone modules and drum machines all connected, you can use any MIDI interface to trigger any sound source and increase the total possible combinations of tools/sounds available. A MIDI interface is an excellent addition to any studio.

Keyboard and MIDI Controller

A MIDI keyboard is a viable option for the producer who wants to use rack mounted tone generators and VSTs. Full sized keys and a full length board increases the playing options since you may not always be the only producer working out of your studio. The aim here is a well rounded studio which is able to accommodate various workflows without the avoidable limitations. You may not play the keyboard well today but…

Microphone, Vocal Chain and Acoustics

There are many opportunities to record artists beyond making demos or pre-production tracking. Even for the recording of ideas or inspirations, a microphone is a vital tool in any studio. It is always best to record the vocals dry (without any effects like reverb) and minimal processing from a compressor (to decrease the variation in volume level) and Gate (to eliminate ambient noise). The reflection of sounds off the walls of your studio will adversely affect your ability to properly hear your production and negatively impact your mixing curves. Padded walls and bass traps are recommended.

Speakers verse Monitors verse Headphones

A car is about the worst acoustic space you can find which is why it’s always a good idea to test your mixes on the road. Home stereo systems tend to have an inaccurate/sweetened bottom end, diminished middle and a curve upward on the highs. The EQ line looks like a smile and is the reason why everything sounds good coming out. Headphones will enhance the stereo field. The best option is a system without as much coloration as possible. Studio monitors are meant to deliver the most accurate account of ‘what’s doing with your audio’. Beyond reviews, salesman recommendations and company reputation, you’ll have to select monitors YOU can mix with. Once you have selected your monitors you will have to ‘learn them’ by listening to well recorded material and hearing the impact of your studio space on the material.

Sequencers

I saved this aspect for last because I feel it’s the most important element. Your interface, whether it’s the LED from a drum machine/groove box or the GUI from a software tracker, is the place where you will spend most of your studio time. It’s the studio tool you’ll turn on first and turn off last. Countless hours will be spent here as you search for inspiration, fine tune ideas, mix and even master your latest production. All of the major sequencers have enough functionality to bring your creative sparks into reality, but they differ greatly on presentation and workflow. Here is a listing of some of the most popular sequencers available.

Ableton Live  http://www.ableton.com/
Apple Logic http://www.apple.com/logicpro/
Digidesign ProTools http://www.digidesign.com/
Cakewalk Project 5 http://www.cakewalk.com/products/Project5/default.asp
Cakewalk Sonar  http://www.cakewalk.com/

Cockos Reaper http://reaper.fm/
Imagine Line Fruity Loops http://www.flstudio.com/
Mackie Tracktion http://www.mackie.com/products/tracktion2/
MOTU Digital Performer http://www.motu.com/products/software/
Propellerhead Reason http://www.propellerheads.se/
Sony Acid http://www.sonymediasoftware.com/products/acidfamily.asp
Steinberg Cubase http://www.steinberg.net/

Steinberg Sequel http://www.steinberg.net/27_1.html

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Best value microX, microKorg  TR

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Roland Fantom X, G

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Best value Juno-G, SP 404

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Roland MV 8800

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Yamaha Motif ES, XS

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And so…what should I use to make my beats?
A classic production related question that has no definite answer. If you round up any group of producers and pose this question you usually get a suggested favorite workflow. Assuming the talent levels are even you can make music using any workflow or combination of studio pieces.
“Music production is the relationship between the creativity of the artist and the craftsmanship he is able to employ through the mastery of his tools.
When I read that quote I thought ‘damn, that’s an ill definition, but it really doesn’t spell out the hidden tangibles. I consider music production to be “the result of a particular sound placed when.” That’s all you really have to go on. You choose a sound, whether it’s an existing tone or something you created and manipulated and decide this is a puzzle piece and decide next when to place it in time. This encompasses all the aspects of sound design and timing -also known as rhythm. Most of us in the studio have agreed to use the term EAR as in an ear for music. Your ear tells you when elements are out of tune and when timing needs to be tighter or looser.
Should I pick my gear by what other producers use?
You can never buy a piece of gear and suddenly become as talented as another producer. For some elements of sound design, it’s prudent to pursue a particular bit of gear to add the tone many other producers have taken advantage of. There is a confidence that lies behind a studio tool knowing it has been used on countless hits and is reliable to deliver a musical tone. Many artists and producers start out emulating other producers and eventually switch to the pursuit of their own voice and a unique and original sound. It doesn’t hurt to explore different techniques and explore the various methods of production so feel free to mix and match systems.
As stated above, you spend a great amount of time staring at the screen of your chosen sequencer and interacting with your hardware. Features and specs only tell half the story. What may be the most important factor is the comfort level you are able to achieve with your workflow. The final choice rounds down to which method of production allows you the freedom to use your ear and sense of rhythm to produce the music you want to.
Press pause. See you in the lab.
Griffin Avid