Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Korg’

KORG FREE SAMPLEpack for the microSAMPLER

September 17, 2012 Leave a comment

http://www.korg.com/microsampler

KORG microSAMPLER

The microSAMPLER hosts a solid complement of top-end sampling features to expand your creative potential.

PC/MAC:Soundware:microSAMPLER_Bonus_Sample_Pack_4.zip

microSAMPLER: Bonus Sample Pack Fourth Edition is the most exciting pack yet! It all starts with a full bank of samples from the product that put Korg on the map: the DONCA MATIC electromechanical rhythm box. Painstakingly sampled from Korg Inc’s own recently restored DONCA MATIC, this bank features individual tones, patterns and even samplings of the mechanical noises the DONCA MATIC produced, for complete authenticity. Add to this three insanely fresh banks from the magic workers at SAMPLE MAGIC (Deep Tech-House, Nu-Rave and Organic House), and Bonus Pack four becomes a must-have. As always, it’s free of charge and completely license free!

Korg has prepared yet another compilation of bonus sounds for your microSAMPLER, downloadable for free from the microSAMPLER support page .

First, we invite you to experience a bit of Korg history with our exclusive Doncamatic samples! The Doncamatic is the first product ever produced by Korg; an electro-mechanical rhythm box made nearly 50 years ago. Korg engineers restored the original Doncamatic at our Korg Product Museum in Tokyo to its original condition to create these samples! The Doncamatic was used most recently on the single “DONCAMATIC,” released by the internationally famous group Gorillaz. Enjoy One-Shot sounds, Loops, and Patterns of this important classic.

Next up is three banks created by our friends at SampleMagic, and compiled by Sharooz Raoofi. Each of their Deep Tech-House, Nu-Rave, and Organic House selections includes a great set of patterns tempo-synced to the pattern sequencer for instant use. More details are available with the free download. Click on Support and explore all of the free downloadable sample for your microSAMPLER

The latest addition to the Korg “micro” series serves up sampling with a powerful performance punch! The microSAMPLER delivers multi-mode sampling, resampling, Pattern Sequencing and over-the-top effects – and all under a fun-to-use intuitive interface. More than just a sampler, the microSAMPLER is a complete sound design studio for creating up-to-the minute loops and phrases.

Giant Sampling / microSIZE
The microSAMPLER hosts a solid complement of top-end sampling features to expand your creative potential. This full-fledged instrument offers fourteen-voice polyphony, reverse playback, editing operations such as Normalize and Truncate, and a Time Stretch feature that lets you change the tempo without affecting the pitch. Selectable sample rates of 48 kHz, 24 kHz, 12 kHz, and down to 6 kHz let you sample at rates beyond CD clarity or add in that Lo-Fi vintage vibe. Each bank contains 36 samples (a maximum of approximately 160 seconds of recording time for monaural samples at a 48 kHz sampling rate) and sixteen patterns of sequence data; the microSAMPLER lets you store eight such banks in internal memory. The Keyboard mode takes a single sample and assigns it chromatically across the keys for instant playability. With its recessed controls, bright LEDs and informative display, the microSAMPLER is fun to use and easy to operate – for beginners or seasoned pros.

Swiss Army Sampling
Too many instruments simply offer sampling as an added feature. The microSAMPLER is all about sampling, in every creative form. Five distinct sampling methods allow you to work the way you want, to get the results you need. The microSAMPLER offers traditional One-Shot and Loop sampling, plus a number of creative sampling modes – Loop, Key Gate and Auto-Next. When it comes to sampling, the microSAMPLER has it all.

  • Loop sampling for recording grooves and phrases, drum loops, etc.
  • One-Shot sampling for grabbing and triggering single events such as drums, etc.
  • Gate sampling for playing a sound musically across the keyboard
  • Auto-Next sampling for capturing phrases as multiple samples. For grabbing a groove as separate samples on individual keys, choose the AUTO NEXT mode and use Tap Tempo to match the BPM of the source material. The microSAMPLER will automatically divide the sample equally across multiple keys. Each key can be set to capture anything from a 64th note to a full two measures. This method lets you automatically perform the same type of sampling as KEY GATE.
  • Key Gate sampling is best for grabbing multiple samples from the same source. With Key Gate, you can take multiple samples from the same source or phrase and assign them to different keys as you play them! The individual keys assign the sample and enable recording all at the same time. This intuitive method of sampling, editing, and mapping in a single step is fun, interactive and fast.

In addition, there’s a resampling function that lets you play existing layered samples processed by an effect and played by the pattern sequencer – and capture it all as a new sample. You can even sample while playing, allowing the sampling process itself to become part of your expressive performance.

Sample anytime, anywhere – or anything!
The microSAMPLER can run on batteries, so you can perform on the go – or capture samples anywhere. Both line input and mic input are provided to allow a broad range of input sources including electronic musical instruments, CD, and voice. A gooseneck microphone is included so you can capture sounds with ease. The convenient caddies (located beside the mic jack) provide a cradle for your portable MP3/audio player when using it as a sample source. Truly, the world is yours to sample anytime and anyplace.

Pattern Possibilities
The pattern sequencer uses an overdub operating style that lets you continually layer your performances. You can switch between patterns during playback for seamless performances. Up to sixteen patterns (16,000 notes per pattern, or a maximum 64,000 notes) can be stored in each bank.

The KAOSS Effect(s)
Developed for Korg’s KAOSS PAD series, the effect engine serves up a great selection of effects – so important when editing samples. The twenty-one effects include not only traditional delay and chorus, but also ring modulator and grain shifter, and even a Looper that’s derived from the Loop Recording feature of the KAOSSILATOR Dynamic Phrase Synthesizer. The effects can be applied to any sound while resampling, allowing the effects to be used over and over again for more sonic expression.

Made to be Played
The microSAMPLER features our new Natural Touch micro keyboard, offering greatly enhanced playability and expressive power. By adjusting the proportion of the black keys and white keys, we’ve made chords easier to finger, and the touch has been improved so that rapid phrases can be played more easily – and with less fatigue. The box-shaped keys project a sense of quality, and also allow smoother glides and smears. The controllers you need for an exciting performance are laid out on the panel for intuitive operation. The status of the samples assigned to each key (and the item being edited) is indicated by the lit state of the LEDs running along the top of the keyboard, ensuring excellent visibility even on stage.

USB-eautiful
By using the free editor/librarian software for the microSAMPLER, you can manage a gigantic sample library that’s all your own. You can back up sample and pattern sequence data to your computer via USB, or load samples and patterns back in just as easily. . Importing and exporting of WAV/AIFF data on your computer is also supported. The possibilities are endless…

New Sample Banks for microSAMPLERTHIRD PARTY SUPPORT:
Download four FREE new sample banks for the microSAMPLER, courtesy of Producer’s Edge Magazine. These banks contain a total of 136 sounds, including drums, bass, leads, sound effects, and more.
www.producersedgemagazine.com/microsampler.aspAND…and don’t forget all the other microSAMPLER goodies on the PE Mag blog!!!!!!

Advertisements

Music Production: Where should I start?

October 26, 2011 2 comments
Music Production: Where should I start?
Words by Griffin Avid

 

One of the most frequently asked question is ‘What do I need to get started with Hip Hop production?’ It’s overheard in music retailers and posted on forums. The typical answer usually consists of entry level software, a staple drum machine or workstation keyboard. More important that what you should get is what you bring to the table and how you intend to work.

My initial foray into Hip Hop consisted of commandeering the home stereo system (a phonograph was my first turntable) and digging through my sister’s closet for a microphone that came with her tape machine. The first sampler I ever used had 90 mins  sample time. Don’t sleep on the dual tape deck. My parent’s record collection was raided for my first sound library. Today, you might be utilizing mom’s old computer and the Casio keyboard you received for your 12th birthday.

No matter how you approach a production task, the workflow will involve both hardware and software. Hardware is controlled by software, software runs on hardware. Increasing the quality of either will have a positive effect on the sound quality of your production work. But! keep in mind it’s the relationship between your creativity and talent in conjunction with your tool set that decides the final results of your production work.

 

Teach me how to make beats

No one can teach you how to make beats. True, you can pick up a book about production or magazine and read up on the subject, scan a production website and dig through all sorts of tips and tricks. Yes, you can watch videos of another producer laying down tracks and adopt some of their working system. You might even be advised ‘Work at these tempos’ and ‘Put the snares and kicks here and here’. A mentor may even bring you along and share a production style or workflow. Fledgling producers may even snatch up the original samples used in a track and reverse engineer the composition. All these ‘educational exercises’ add tools to your box, but they do not teach you How, Why and When to use them. The actual learning occurs as you are producing.

 

What’s In a Studio?

The level of a studio is obviously defined by the sound coming out of it. There is base level of equipment any producer should aim to stay above. For the analogy of a tool set, you can imagine a wrench that was machined improperly. Now, instead of gripping and loosening, your tool is stripping the nut and damaging whatever you were working on. It follows then, you don’t need the most expensive tool set available to achieve great results, but I also stand by the cliché of selecting the right tool for the job. We won’t be discussing budget here since the ability to actually produce music is more important than assembling the ultimate studio on your first trip to the gear shop.

 

Audio Interface

The soundcard is a very important part of your studio chain and often a huge factor in the overall sound quality. The default card in a computer is usually inappropriate for music production since it lacks the base level connectors (RCA [back of your VCR]) and the number of adaptors needed to make studio connections degrades the signal too greatly. Be sure to take note of the actual connection points in your studio before you pick up a dozen XLRs and find you needed ¼ inch cables instead. Also pay attention to the end points. ‘Males’ are the plugs and ‘females’ are the sockets/openings.

 

MIDI Connections.

MIDI allows computers, synthesizers, MIDI controllers, sound cards, samplers and drum machines to control one another, and to exchange system data. MIDI does not transmit audio—it simply transmits real time digital data providing information such as the type and intensity of the musical notes and technical cues played during a performance.

Flexibility is key here. There is more to MIDI-ing  up a studio than Out going to IN. If you have several tone modules and drum machines all connected, you can use any MIDI interface to trigger any sound source and increase the total possible combinations of tools/sounds available. A MIDI interface is an excellent addition to any studio.

 

Keyboard and MIDI Controller

A MIDI keyboard is a viable option for the producer who wants to use rack mounted tone generators and VSTs. Full sized keys and a full length board increases the playing options since you may not always be the only producer working out of your studio. The aim here is a well rounded studio which is able to accommodate various workflows without the avoidable limitations. You may not play the keyboard well today but…

 

Microphone, Vocal Chain and Acoustics

There are many opportunities to record artists beyond making demos or pre-production tracking. Even for the recording of ideas or inspirations, a microphone is a vital tool in any studio. It is always best to record the vocals dry (without any effects like reverb) and minimal processing from a compressor (to decrease the variation in volume level) and Gate (to eliminate ambient noise). The reflection of sounds off the walls of your studio will adversely affect your ability to properly hear your production and negatively impact your mixing curves. Padded walls and bass traps are recommended.

 

Speakers verse Monitors verse Headphones

A car is about the worst acoustic space you can find which is why it’s always a good idea to test your mixes on the road. Home stereo systems tend to have an inaccurate/sweetened bottom end, diminished middle and a curve upward on the highs. The EQ line looks like a smile and is the reason why everything sounds good coming out. Headphones will enhance the stereo field. The best option is a system without as much coloration as possible. Studio monitors are meant to deliver the most accurate account of ‘what’s doing with your audio’. Beyond reviews, salesman recommendations and company reputation, you’ll have to select monitors YOU can mix with. Once you have selected your monitors you will have to ‘learn them’ by listening to well recorded material and hearing the impact of your studio space on the material.

 

Sequencers

I saved this aspect for last because I feel it’s the most important element. Your interface, whether it’s the LED from a drum machine/groove box or the GUI from a software tracker, is the place where you will spend most of your studio time. It’s the studio tool you’ll turn on first and turn off last. Countless hours will be spent here as you search for inspiration, fine tune ideas, mix and even master your latest production. All of the major sequencers have enough functionality to bring your creative sparks into reality, but they differ greatly on presentation and workflow. Here is a listing of some of the most popular sequencers available.

 

Ableton Live  http://www.ableton.com/
Apple Logic http://www.apple.com/logicpro/
Digidesign ProTools http://www.digidesign.com/
Cakewalk Project 5 http://www.cakewalk.com/products/Project5/default.asp
Cakewalk Sonar  http://www.cakewalk.com/

Cockos Reaper http://reaper.fm/
Imagine Line Fruity Loops http://www.flstudio.com/
Mackie Tracktion http://www.mackie.com/products/tracktion2/
MOTU Digital Performer http://www.motu.com/products/software/
Propellerhead Reason http://www.propellerheads.se/
Sony Acid http://www.sonymediasoftware.com/products/acidfamily.asp
Steinberg Cubase http://www.steinberg.net/

Steinberg Sequel http://www.steinberg.net/27_1.html

 

Total Solution Hardware Workstations

 

AKAI MPC 2500, 5000

http://www.akaipro.com/prodMPC2500.php

http://www.akaipro.com/prodMPC5000.php

Best value MPC 1000

http://www.akaipro.com/prodMPC1000.php

 

KORG Triton Extreme, M3

http://www.korg.com/gear/prod_info.asp?a_prod_no=TRITONEXTREME&category_id=1

http://www.korg.com/gear/prod_info.asp?a_prod_no=M3&category_id=1

Best value microX, microKorg  TR

http://www.korg.com/gear/info.asp?a_prod_no=TR&category_id=1

http://www.korg.com/gear/info.asp?A_PROD_NO=microX

 

Roland Fantom X, G

http://www.rolandus.com/products/productdetails.aspx?ObjectId=920&ParentId=83

Best value Juno-G, SP 404

http://www.rolandus.com/products/productdetails.aspx?ObjectId=756&ParentId=83

http://www.rolandus.com/products/productdetails.aspx?ObjectId=728&ParentId=84

 

Roland MV 8800

http://www.rolandus.com/products/productdetails.aspx?ObjectId=848&ParentId=84

 

Yamaha Motif ES, XS

http://www.yamaha.com/yamahavgn/CDA/ContentDetail/ModelSeriesDetail/0,,CNTID%25253D544448%252526CTID%25253D206400%252526CNTYP%25253DPRODUCT,00.html

Best value MM6

http://www.yamaha.com/yamahavgn/CDA/ContentDetail/ModelSeriesDetail/0,,CNTID%25253D544864%252526CTID%25253D206400,00.html

http://www.yamaha.com/yamahavgn/CDA/ContentDetail/ModelSeriesDetail/0,,CNTID%25253D62580%252526CTID%25253D206400%252526CNTYP%25253DPRODUCT,00.html

 

 

 

And so…what should I use to make my beats?
A classic production related question that has no definite answer. If you round up any group of producers and pose this question you usually get a suggested favorite workflow. Assuming the talent levels are even you can make music using any workflow or combination of studio pieces.
“Music production is the relationship between the creativity of the artist and the craftsmanship he is able to employ through the mastery of his tools.
When I read that quote I thought ‘damn, that’s an ill definition, but it really doesn’t spell out the hidden tangibles. I consider music production to be “the result of a particular sound placed when.” That’s all you really have to go on. You choose a sound, whether it’s an existing tone or something you created and manipulated and decide this is a puzzle piece and decide next when to place it in time. This encompasses all the aspects of sound design and timing -also known as rhythm. Most of us in the studio have agreed to use the term EAR as in an ear for music. Your ear tells you when elements are out of tune and when timing needs to be tighter or looser.
Should I pick my gear by what other producers use?
You can never buy a piece of gear and suddenly become as talented as another producer. For some elements of sound design, it’s prudent to pursue a particular bit of gear to add the tone many other producers have taken advantage of. There is a confidence that lies behind a studio tool knowing it has been used on countless hits and is reliable to deliver a musical tone. Many artists and producers start out emulating other producers and eventually switch to the pursuit of their own voice and a unique and original sound. It doesn’t hurt to explore different techniques and explore the various methods of production so feel free to mix and match systems.
As stated above, you spend a great amount of time staring at the screen of your chosen sequencer and interacting with your hardware. Features and specs only tell half the story. What may be the most important factor is the comfort level you are able to achieve with your workflow. The final choice rounds down to which method of production allows you the freedom to use your ear and sense of rhythm to produce the music you want to.
Press pause. See you in the lab.
Griffin Avid

http://forum.producersedgemagazine.com/

http://www.producersedgemagazine.com/

http://www.studioavx.com/